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Editing Human rights-based-budgeting

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Increased financial inclusion, transparency and accountability around the budget would give recognition to the significant role the voluntary sector and communities play in achieving better outcomes for people across Scotland. Shifting the conversation from budget reductions to one focused on what Scotland needs to accomplish through its budget and how to realise this would lead to a fundamental change in how the government works with the voluntary sector.  
 
Increased financial inclusion, transparency and accountability around the budget would give recognition to the significant role the voluntary sector and communities play in achieving better outcomes for people across Scotland. Shifting the conversation from budget reductions to one focused on what Scotland needs to accomplish through its budget and how to realise this would lead to a fundamental change in how the government works with the voluntary sector.  
  
Although Scotland is a member of the global Open Government Partnership[RS2] , there is still a long way for both national and local government to travel in the area of open budgeting. The Open Budget Survey is the only global, independent, comparative measure of budget transparency, participation and oversight of national governments. The draft results for the 2019 survey (undertaken by the Scottish Human Rights Commission following the OBS methodology) reveal that Scotland only provides the public with limited budget information. Of the eight key budget documents assessed as necessary, Scotland only published half of these for the budget year under review with no pre-budget statement, citizens budget, in-year reports and mid-year reports.  
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Although Scotland is a member of the global Open Government Partnership[RS2] , there is still a long way for both national and local government to travel in the area of open budgeting. The Open Budget Survey is the only global, independent, comparative measure of budget transparency, participation and oversight of national governments. The draft results for the 2019 survey (undertaken by the Scottish Human Rights Commission following the OBS methodology) reveal that Scotland only provides the public with limited budget information. Of the eight key budget documents assessed as necessary, Scotland only publishes half of these for the budget year under review with no pre-budget statement, citizens budget, in-year reports and mid-year reports.  
  
The draft survey result also indicates a low score for public participation in Scotland's budget process, highlighting the minimal opportunities for the voluntary sector to engage. Genuine involvement in the budget process is as significant as budget transparency; it is a crucial principle of taking a human rights-based approach to budget setting and implementation. Budget documentation that is clear and engaging should be made available to citizens, and the government should actively engage vulnerable and marginalised communities during the development and implementation of the budget.  
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The draft survey also indicates a low score for public participation in Scotland's budget process, highlighting the minimal opportunities for the voluntary sector to engage. Genuine involvement in the budget process is as significant as budget transparency; it is a crucial principle of taking a human rights-based approach to budget setting and implementation. Budget documentation that is clear and engaging should be made available to citizens, and the government should actively engage vulnerable and marginalised communities during the development and implementation of the budget.  
  
 
Open budgeting is now internationally accepted best practise adopted by governments of all sizes. Scotland will realise its ambition to adopt a human rights-based approach to the budget only by taking this approach. Some examples of best practice include:
 
Open budgeting is now internationally accepted best practise adopted by governments of all sizes. Scotland will realise its ambition to adopt a human rights-based approach to the budget only by taking this approach. Some examples of best practice include:

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